Missing Answers – Medium Receives Cold Case Clues

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Kim Dennis has been having a lot of visions of dead people lately, but that’s not unusual. The popular and eerily-accurate clairvoyant and medium in Calgary, who has gained a reputation for talking with the deceased, has been visited by spirited individuals who are looking for help in solving their own mysteries.

 
“I was doing a reading recently and a young girl came through,” she says. “She identified herself as a murder victim who grew up in the same town as the client. The woman recognized the girl’s name and confirmed who she was. Then the spirit proceeded to tell me how she died and where her body was.”

For a few weeks afterward, the girl continued to visit Dennis, giving more details about her violent death in Northern Alberta over 20 years ago. Unsure as to how to proceed, Dennis did a little more research with the help of the girl.

“I was unloading my dishwasher when she showed up,” she says. “I told her I didn’t know who to contact, and she suggested looking on the Internet. I didn’t find anything at first, but she kept telling me to scroll down. That’s when I found Rhonda Morgan from the Missing Children’s Society.”

Solving mysteries of death and unknown details is regular fare for Dennis. For the past 11 years, she’s read over a thousand clients (and the thousands of dead people who show up with them), helping to answer questions about life after life, alleviate guilt, remorse, suspicion, and grief, and reveal hidden secrets. She has established a loyal following, is a published author, and has appeared on radio and television, including her own television show on Access. 

Dennis says she is simply the medium by which the information is forwarded, and owes a lot of the insight to the deceased. She believes the benefits of the readings are two-fold; the dead get to have their say, and the living understand that there is no end to life, and that they are always surrounded by family and friends.

Armed with compelling information, and a persistent spirit floating around, she contacted Morgan, who listened to the details with great interest. As founder of the Missing Children’s Society of Canada, Morgan says she started the organization in 1986, after watching a television program about three missing kids in Alberta.

“I felt driven to be involved and called the only organization that was in existence at that time,” she says. “There wasn’t a lot being done for as far as hands-on search, so I trained as a private investigator. Now we’re a national organization with 13 staff members.” Over 60,000 children go missing every year in Canada. Most of which return home quickly and safely, but there is a small percentage who do not. In the last 20 years, the organization has been involved in 19 cases where the children have met with foul play. Currently, they are working on 33 missing cases of such a nature. As Dennis relayed the information, Morgan was stunned at the accuracy of the girl’s details. Ironically, it was one of the cases that Morgan watched on the television program that inspired her to launch MCSC. 

“The information she gave was very precise,” she says. “I’ve always been open minded about this kind of information and we have always taken it seriously. I was excited at the prospect of getting some help, after all this time, to push the case forward again.” Morgan says the next step is to put the information in the hands of her investigation team to confirm details, but this takes time. “It’s a slow, step-by-step process, sometimes, unfortunately,” she says. “It becomes difficult when the case is so old and the landscapes and landmarks have changed so radically. Hopefully on the fresher cases, we can get information on those cases and fit it in.”


 

 
D ennis is not undaunted by the delay. She has contacted search and rescue professionals in Northern Alberta, who have offered to volunteer their time to help find the girl’s remains once the snow melts.

“I think the girl just wants to be found for her family’s sake,” Dennis says. “The deceased is always aware that you are grieving, and she just wants to bring them some peace.”

She has also captured the attention of “Norm,” a retired Alberta police officer and private investigator, who is also voluntarily assisting Dennis.

“We were chatting one day and she mentioned some things that were interesting and intriguing about some cold cases” he says. “I was surprised at how she knew some intimate details on the files that I worked on years ago.”

Psychic visions and information has often led police down a road to disappointment. This is one of the reasons why he is keeping an open mind in his investigations with Dennis, though he admits some of her information is too intimate for the general population to know. 

“For the primary investigators, there is some disappointment, but some have had success,” he says. “I understand the frustration on the part of those who get details, and no one will listen to them. The process is difficult to change because credibility is essential.”

Time is an adversary in missing person, homicide, or suspicious disappearance cases. Norm says as days, weeks, even years pass, memory and evidence fades, and other more recent cases jump in the way. This can hamper locating the missing person, and potentially, establishing a conviction if foul play is involved.

“It’s difficult to get information once the critical investigation time has passed,” he says. "Forensics has taken over where instinct played a role. And with increased case loads, it is harder to find the time, the staff, or the people who know the truth.”

Norm and Dennis are currently working on investigating several cases of missing persons and unsolved crimes, some of which occurred as far back as 25 years. This may not result in finding a culprit, but it can potentially bring closure to family and friends of victims.

“I am certainly willing to look at all avenues if it means solving a case,” he says. “Sometimes you have to go out of the mainstream and try something a little more unusual or different. If Kim can prove a measure of success, people will listen.”

Dennis has already successfully assisted other families in locating their loved ones. “Julia,” mother of three adult children, has dealt with the burden of her oldest son going missing for days, even years, at a time. Not knowing if he was alive or dead, she visited Dennis six years ago, and received comforting information that he was living in a shelter in Ontario.

Recently, he went missing again, and called on Dennis to help.

“His wife and I went to see her, and she told us that he was still alive,” Julia says. “She said he would call a friend in two to four days. Exactly on the fourth day at 4:00 in the afternoon, we got a phone call that he was safe.”

Julia says the stress she has experienced over the years has been somewhat assuaged by Dennis’ insights.

“After I met with her, it was a big relief,” she adds. “It was good to know that there was a chance he was coming back home and that we could intervene and get his life on track.”

Dennis says she isn’t looking for any compensation for her work with police or MCSC, but rather, the opportunity to help resolve outstanding details and mysteries. She is even producing a new television show that profiles people who simply want answers to burning questions.

“If there is someone out there who needs help in solving an old case, a mysterious death, or finding out a family secret, we’d like to talk to them,” she says. “So many people I‘ve read get such relief from truth. It will set you free.”

If you have any information on any missing child, contact the Missing Children’s Society of Canada at 291-0705, toll-free at 1-800-661-6160, or email to info@mcsc.ca. For more information on Kim Dennis or details about the upcoming television program, call 283.8424 or email to kim@clairvoyantkim.com.

Calgary Herald - Thursday, April 10, 2008

2 Comments

  1. robin says:

    I would like to have a session with you, would like to know how to go about doing that.

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